My dog fights me while I am trying to groom him what can do?

Brainy dog blog

I tend to want to pick my battles on that one. When I have a dog testy in that way I let the groomer or the vet do most of the work. The groomer or vet has a different relationship with the dog than you do and can do some of the heavy

lifting,so to speak, for you.

 Before I start doing any grooming  I would get any energy he has out with running and playing with him, then some commands,so I'm setting up leadership.

  1.  put the dog in place,

  2.  start grooming

  3.  correct bad behavior pop the leash on the prong collar

  4. Say good for good behavior and end on the good behavior

The goal is to keep it short and sweet at first so he can see that good behavior gets what he wants (which is for you to stop grooming)


 Yes he does need to know that he's not allowed to growl or bite when he needs grooming. but timing can help and making sure you are in control and assertive, not frustrated, that will only add to the problem.

The more small times you do this will lead to better times overall.

Let me know if this helps. We can talk it through on the phone, or try something else. Every dog is different we just need to figure out what works!

Darlene

Why does my dog do that? Peeing in the house, growling, chewing things up...

A dog can be an amazing addition to any family, providing the unconditional love and companionship you didn’t know you needed until now. Better yet, pets can improve your health in myriad ways, from reducing your risk of depression to improving your cardiovascular health. But, sometimes, your little sweetie does things that are not so charming.

For dogs who pee indoors, this behavior is often related to a lack of physical exercise or anxiety, both of which humans can help attenuate with the help of a vet or trainer. 

 It could be a sign that he’s not so happy about your behavior. If your pet is pooping wherever he pleases,  It could also be a sign your pet is fearful, so consider addressing your own behaviors, like yelling or slamming doors, that could make them scared. Is there a lot of stress in your house with other family members? Or are you modeling the kitchen? These are all things that can get your dog out of sorts and doing things he wouldn't normally do.

Growling can mean a lot of things good and bad. My Cooper low growls when I am scratching his back but I know he is growling for more. It can also mean your dogs had enough of what's ever going on or a chance they’re feeling threatened or upset and want to get some distance. However, this is often a sign of illness, as well, so if your pet is growling at you frequently, it’s time to call the vet.

How do I make Vet. visits less stressful for my dog?

Question: How can I make the Vet visit less stressful? Everything about the veterinarian's office is stressful for a dog. Starting with the smell, new dogs in the waiting area, getting handled by unfamiliar people in invasive ways. The best way to help a dog who is fearful is familiarity. Ask the vet if they are open to practice visits
*Take your dog once a week for a while to the vet's office and just walk in the door and around the waiting area. Staying 5 min.
*Next visit have the office staff give treats. Pet if your dog is ok with it.
* Week 3 ask to go in an exam room with vets/vet tech. walking in and out.
You get the idea, it takes some time but will make vet visits more normal for your dog. Need help?www.artemisdogtraining.com

Stop the Barking!

barker.jpg

Dogs and barking!  most folks really love their dogs but uncontrolled barking is a really annoying problem. We try to diagnose what the root issue of the issue. Many of my clients see increased bad behaviors in their dogs when the new baby comes home or there has been a lifestyle change. This is mostly because you are busy with a life change and a new baby and don't take the time to meet your dogs needs. If you can take 20 min. with your dog to play, one on one with just him, go for a walk, exercise at a dog park or park; your dog will feel more satisfied and less likely to nag you with bad behaviors and over excitement.

 

3 Reasons Dogs Bite

While biting is a form of aggression, only a small percentage of dogs that bite are actually aggressive.

Here are three reason which may cause a dog to bite according to Jonathan Klein, a dog behavior specialist, and animal behaviorist Dorothy Litwin.

1. Fear

Unless your dog is aggressive by nature, biting typically results from fear. A well-meaning neighbor may reach his hand out to pet your dog – but the dog, not wanting to be touched, or frightened by the stranger’s hand, may snap at him. “Quite often, people think they can just pet dogs on the head, taking for granted that dogs like to be touched,” says Dorothy.

2. Possessiveness

Whether your dog is possessive about food, a toy or territory, trying to take the thing he’s protecting away can result in signs of aggression, including biting. “What not to do is prove you’re stronger than the dog and take his stuff away,” says Jonathan. If your dog is possessive over food and shows aggression every time you approach his bowl, for example, Jonathan advises showing the dog that you’re going to make things better by adding a treat to the bowl. That way, he’ll come to associate your approach with something positive. Swapping one toy for another or trading a treat for a toy can help a dog overcome toy possession.

3. Pain or other medical reasons

If your dog is experiencing pain or discomfort, she may bite when someone touches her in the painful region. For example, you may not realize your dog has an ear infection until you touch her ear and are surprised when she snaps at your hand. Dorothy recommends that you always try to find a physical reason why your dog has started biting, especially if this is unusual behavior for her, and that if you can’t see anything obvious, to take her to the vet for a checkup.

When it comes to dog bites, prevention is the best route to take. A dog that bites isn’t necessarily aggressive or “bad”; he may just be fearful, protective and/or poorly socialized. Understanding why dogs bite, learning how to read canine body language, and taking steps to prevent situations that could lead to biting, are proactive and effective ways to avoid this behavior.

Take heart, dogs will be dogs!

photo-2.jpg

Getting frustrated when your dog acts like…a dog. Dogs bark, dig, chew, sniff, and steal table scraps that are within snout’s reach. To them, it’s natural behavior! (Plus, they don’t understand the value of your favorite pair of shoes.) However, this doesn’t mean your dog should have free reign to do whatever he likes. It's your job to redirected these behaviors–and this takes patience! So take a deep breath, and get some perspective, we are here for you. Send us a message

Are You Confusing Your Dog?

Are You Confusing Your Dog?

Giving multiple verbal cues to indicate the same behavior.This one can be a tough habit to break! Say your dog is barking at the mailman, so you say, “shh!” “stop!” and “quiet.” You’ve given her three different commands that are supposed mean the same thing: quit barking! Your dog gets confused so she continues to bark and eventually gets scolded–but she doesn’t know why! The best plan is to come up with specific words to apply to each trick or command, and to make sure everyone in your family is on the same page. If you use “down” for “lay down,” you may have to use something like “floor” to tell your pup to get off the bed!